Preparing for the new year?  Prepare to reinvent yourself.

My first computer (back in the day) was the Commodore 64 (named after it’s “powerful” 64 kilobytes of RAM).  As a kid, it was exciting to see how cool it was to have “the latest and greatest”.
It didn’t take long to realize that we had a piece of junk taking up space in our home.  Over the years, with every fancy technology upgrade I’ve purchased, I have experienced this “piece of junk” feeling within a shorter and shorter period of time.
A couple of years ago I purchased a Tesla.  As I marveled about this great technology, I thought to myself, “How many years from now am I going to say ‘Yeah, my first electric car was the old piece of junk Tesla.  It only gave me 265 miles on a charge.’?”  People would laugh because every electric car will have a minimum of a 1000 mile range.  Will it be 5 years from now?  10 years from now?  I don’t know – but I am sure that we will all laugh at how brutal our technology was in 2016.
Is it really that different when it comes to ourselves?  I look back at my 20’s and it’s embarrassing.  I was so sure I had it all figured out.  I knew so much.  Then, with a little time, a little humility, and a bunch of experience, I realize that the older I get the more I realize I don’t know.  (Is it possible I’m getting dumber with age?)
We MUST reinvent ourselves.  We MUST become better versions of ourselves, otherwise we risk becoming obsolete.  Not only obsolete to our careers, but obsolete to our social lives, our emotional health, our physical health, our spiritual lives.
To me, the holiday time sparks a time for reflection.  Out with the old, in with the new.  What do I not like about my life?  What do I like about my life?  What are my biggest priorities?  What do I want in the new year?  How can I better myself in the new year?
I hope that we all find time over the holiday season to ask ourselves some very important questions.  None of us want to run our lives on an outdated platform.  Let’s reinvent ourselves and be the best versions of ourselves in the new year.
– Jaime

 

Thoughts for the new year – by Michael Josephson

I hope the past year will go down in your book of life as one filled with great pleasures and grand memories. But whether the year was good, bad, or indifferent, I hope you’ll enter the new year wiser and stronger for your experiences, and optimistic that the best is yet to come.

A vital quality of a happy and successful personal and professional life is continual growth spurred by a commitment to learn through study and experience. This requires the humility to accept that however good you are you can get better and the ambition to be better.

As you look forward to the future – the place where you’ll spend the rest of your life – it’s smart to look back at the immediate past and objectively assess what went well and what didn’t in your job, your relationships, your health, and your overall sense of fulfillment. What did you learn that can make your life better?

If you had a bad year, it’s possible you were a wholly innocent victim, or maybe your own actions or attitudes contributed to serious grief or unhappiness. Either way, please accept my best wishes and sincere condolences. Please be careful, however, not to wallow in sorrow, sympathy, shame, or self-doubt. Don’t allow yesterday’s pain to become tomorrow’s suffering.

Be accountable, but be fair to yourself.

Start the next stage of your life’s journey with optimism and confidence.

Remember, you’re the captain of your own ship. Take the wheel, choose your course, and get on your way.

There may be rough seas ahead, but there will also be enough achievement, growth, reconciliation, and true joy to make the journey worth it.

Abe Lincoln pointed out that one of the good things about the future is it always comes one day at a time.

May this new year be your best year – so far.

Millennials: Why are they unhappy?

H = R – E
Happiness = Reality – Expectations
That really makes a lot of sense.
Millennials (and other generations) should expect great lives.  I don’t think there is anything wrong with high hopes and grand expectations.  I think the big challenging question is this:  In what time frames should I expect these great things?  Greatness will come over years of mastering your craft.  As long as we all understand the 10,000 Rule (it takes 10,000 hours of practice to be considered an expert), then I think we’ll all be in great shape.
Enjoy the read.
Jaime
millennialscollage

Football Lesson in Leadership

I’m sure a bunch of you watched the Sunday night football game between the Seahawks and the Cardinals.  Pretty crazy finish to say the least.

Check out this article from Inc.com.  It’s a great lesson regarding leadership.  How the two coaches reacted and talked about their players to the media is something that we can all learn from.
As leaders, our goal is to build confidence in our people.  Pete Carroll is definitely proficient at this.
Enjoy the read!
-Jaime
Photo from Getty Images

What can I learn/know right now in 10 minutes that will be useful for the rest of my life?

Check out my entire answers on Quora.com: https://www.quora.com/What-can-I-learn-know-right-now-in-10-minutes-that-will-be-useful-for-the-rest-of-my-life/answer/Jaime-Hepp?srid=uYPGu

1) Be a person of your word. It might seem old school – let your word be your bond. It’s interesting how people that can be taken seriously, people that have a high amount of trust from others – they do the simple things like following through with the things they say they’re going to do. I think a lot of people underestimate the power of “let your word be your bond”.

Why Millennials Keep Dumping You: An Open Letter to Management

We have always wanted to create a hip, fun work culture filled with cutting edge ideas and terrific talent.  This article paints a great picture of things to avoid when trying to attract today’s top Millennial talent.  Enjoy the read.

Original Article from  via LinkedIn


This post was cowritten with Elizabeth McLeod, a millennial and cum laude graduate of Boston University, and daughter of Lisa Earle McLeod.

Attracting and keeping top millennial talent is a burning issue for leaders. Millennials are 35% of the workforce. By 2020 they’ll be 46% of the working population.

Some of our most successful clients — organizations like G Adventures, Google, and Hootsuite — are filled with millennials who are on fire for their jobs. Yet many organizations struggle to attract, and retain, top millennial talent.

One of us, Elizabeth, wrote this letter, to share insights about what top-performing millennials want and how leaders can ignite the “energy of a thousand suns.”

An Open Letter to Management:

You hired us thinking this one might be different; this one might be in it for the long haul. We’re six months in, giving everything we have, then suddenly, we drop a bomb on you. We’re quitting.

We know the stereotypes. Millennials never settle down. We’re drowning in debt for useless degrees. We refuse to put our phone away. We are addicted to lattes even at the expense of our water bill. Our bosses are not wrong about these perceptions. But,pointing to our sometimes irresponsible spending and fear of interpersonal commitment isn’t going to solve your problem. You still need us. We’re the ones who’ve mastered social media, who have the energy of a thousand suns, and who will knock back 5-dollar macchiatos until the job is done perfectly.

I’ve worked in corporate America, administrative offices, advertising agencies, and restaurants. I’ve had bosses ranging from 24 to 64. I’ve had bosses I loved, and bosses I didn’t. I’ve seen my peers quit, and I’ve quit a few times myself. Here’s what’s really behind your millennials’ resignation letter:

1. You tolerate low-performance

It’s downright debilitating to a high achiever. I’m working my heart out and every time I look up Donna-Do-Nothing is contemplating how long is too long to take for lunch. I start wondering why leadership tolerates this.

Is that the standard here? No thanks.

Fact: Poor performers have a chilling effect on everyone.

2. ROI is not enough for me.

I spent Sunday thinking about how I can make a difference to our customers. Now it’s Monday morning, what do I hear? Stock price. Billing. ROI. Suddenly, my Monday power playlist seems useless. I’m sitting in a conference room listening to you drag on about cash flow.

I was making more money bartending in college than I am at this entry-level job. You say I’ll get a raise in a year if the company hits a certain number? So what? I need something to care about today. Talk to me about how we make a difference, not your ROI report.

Fact: Organizations with a purpose bigger than money have a growth rate triple that of their competitors.

3. Culture is more than free Panera.

Don’t confuse culture with collateral. Yes, I am a cash-strapped millennial who really appreciates free lunch. But I don’t wake up at 6AM every day to play foosball in the break room. I’m not inspired to be more innovative over a Bacon Turkey Bravo.

I need to be surrounded by people who are on fire for what we’re doing. I need a manager who is motivated to push boundaries and think differently. Working in a cool office is really awesome. So is free lunch. But a purposeful culture is more important.

Fact: A culture of purpose drives exponential sales growth 

4. It’s ok to get personal

Treat me like a number? I’ll return the favor. This job will quickly become nothing more than my rent payment. I’ll start living for Friday and counting down the minutes until 5. After a few months of that, I’ll probably have a drunken epiphany and realize I want more out of my life than this.

Then I’ll prove your assumptions right. 8 months in, I’ll quit and leave. Or worse, I’ll quit and stay, just like Donna-Do-Nothing.

That’s not good for either of us. Here’s what you need to know:

I was raised to believe I could change the world. I’m desperate for you to show me that the work we do here matters, even just a little bit. I’ll make copies, I’ll fetch coffee, I’ll do the grunt work. But I’m not doing it to help you get a new Mercedes.

I’ll give you everything I’ve got, but I need to know it makes a difference to something bigger than your bottom line.

Signed,

A Millennial

The millennials are telling us what we already know in our hearts to be true. People want to make money, they also want to make a difference.   Successful leaders putpurpose before profit, and they wind up with teams who drive revenue through the roof.

Lisa Earle McLeod is the creator of the popular business concept Noble Purpose and author of the bestseller Selling with Noble Purpose: How to Drive Revenue and Do work That Makes You Proud

Character Development

I found this article from my friend – Michael Josephson.  I have always believed that a person’s professional growth is directly tied to personal growth.  In other words, if you work on becoming a better person and continuously “upgrade yourself”, you can expect to see upward mobility in the workplace.

Enjoy the article.

 

7 Seas

The Seven Cs of Character

As you consider your goals for the New Year, I hope you’ll think about working on your character. No, you’re not too old and I don’t mean to imply you’re a bad person. As I’ve said often, “you don’t have to be sick to get better.” In fact, it’s a lot easier to make a good person better than a bad person good.

The struggle to be better takes place during our daily choices.

People of exceptional character stand out from the crowd because they develop the wisdom and strength to know and do the right thing in the face of pressures and temptations to do otherwise.

There are seven core qualities called the Seven Cs of character: conscience, compassion, consideration, confidence, control, courage, and competence.

 

CONSCIENCE. Your conscience is your moral compass.  Take care of it. Use it. Trust it.

COMPASSION. Nurture, express and demonstrate compassion by caring about, giving to and helping whomever you can, whenever you can in all ways that you can.

CONSIDERATION. Be considerate.  Always be aware of how your words and actions affect others so you can do more good and less harm.

CONFIDENCE. Approach every opportunity and challenge with confidence that you are worthy enough and able enough to succeed. Never doubt your inner strength to overcome temptations, difficulties and misfortunes with honor and dignity.

COURAGE.  Protect who you are and what you believe with courage. Master your fears and preserve your integrity by doing what you know is right even if costs more than you  want to pay.

CONTROL. Control the emotions, urges and appetites that demean you, damage your name or diminish your future.

COMPETENCE. Continually build your competence, the knowledge, skill and ability to ethically and effectively solve problems

Do you need it? Do you want it?

People today buy things they don’t need, with money they don’t have, to impress people they don’t care about.  

 

Think about that.  To a certain degree, we all buy in to that statement.  Some a little; some a lot.

Below is a post that I found online that articulates a mindset that would be a healthy adoption for all of us living in countries of abundance.

 

 

Here are my wife’s comments when I showed her the article:   “That’s a great article.  We should post it somewhere, and reread it whenever we think we need to get a bigger and better tv…”

I just purchased a 60 inch Smart TV about a month ago….   😦

 

Enough is Enough

What does it take to make you happy?  How much do you have to have to be grateful?

To the barefoot man, happiness is a pair of old shoes.  To the man with old shoes, it’s a pair of new shoes.  To the man with new shoes, it’s more stylish shoes.  And, of course, the fellow with no feet would be happy to be barefoot.

This leads to the ancient insight:  If you want to be happy, count your blessings, not your burdens.  Measure your life by what you have, not by what you don’t.

Yet in our modern world where we’re continually exposed to endless increments of more and better – others with more money, better TVs, and bigger houses – this is very difficult.

For some people, the pleasure of having something good is drained as soon as they see someone else with something better. Our sense of contentment is created or destroyed by comparisons.

A life consumed with unfulfilled wants is an affliction.  The antidote is the concept of “enough.”

This starts by thinking more clearly about the difference between our needs and our wants, between sufficiency and abundance.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with wanting more and striving to fill our lives with things and experiences that give us pleasure, so long as we don’t believe we need whatever we want.

When we think we need what we really only want, we make our desires preconditions to happiness, thereby diminishing our ability to appreciate and enjoy what we do have.

It’s easy to think that happiness is achieved by getting what we want when it’s really a matter of wanting what we get.

In the end, enough is enough.