Preparing for the new year?  Prepare to reinvent yourself.

My first computer (back in the day) was the Commodore 64 (named after it’s “powerful” 64 kilobytes of RAM).  As a kid, it was exciting to see how cool it was to have “the latest and greatest”.
It didn’t take long to realize that we had a piece of junk taking up space in our home.  Over the years, with every fancy technology upgrade I’ve purchased, I have experienced this “piece of junk” feeling within a shorter and shorter period of time.
A couple of years ago I purchased a Tesla.  As I marveled about this great technology, I thought to myself, “How many years from now am I going to say ‘Yeah, my first electric car was the old piece of junk Tesla.  It only gave me 265 miles on a charge.’?”  People would laugh because every electric car will have a minimum of a 1000 mile range.  Will it be 5 years from now?  10 years from now?  I don’t know – but I am sure that we will all laugh at how brutal our technology was in 2016.
Is it really that different when it comes to ourselves?  I look back at my 20’s and it’s embarrassing.  I was so sure I had it all figured out.  I knew so much.  Then, with a little time, a little humility, and a bunch of experience, I realize that the older I get the more I realize I don’t know.  (Is it possible I’m getting dumber with age?)
We MUST reinvent ourselves.  We MUST become better versions of ourselves, otherwise we risk becoming obsolete.  Not only obsolete to our careers, but obsolete to our social lives, our emotional health, our physical health, our spiritual lives.
To me, the holiday time sparks a time for reflection.  Out with the old, in with the new.  What do I not like about my life?  What do I like about my life?  What are my biggest priorities?  What do I want in the new year?  How can I better myself in the new year?
I hope that we all find time over the holiday season to ask ourselves some very important questions.  None of us want to run our lives on an outdated platform.  Let’s reinvent ourselves and be the best versions of ourselves in the new year.
– Jaime

 

Thoughts for the new year – by Michael Josephson

I hope the past year will go down in your book of life as one filled with great pleasures and grand memories. But whether the year was good, bad, or indifferent, I hope you’ll enter the new year wiser and stronger for your experiences, and optimistic that the best is yet to come.

A vital quality of a happy and successful personal and professional life is continual growth spurred by a commitment to learn through study and experience. This requires the humility to accept that however good you are you can get better and the ambition to be better.

As you look forward to the future – the place where you’ll spend the rest of your life – it’s smart to look back at the immediate past and objectively assess what went well and what didn’t in your job, your relationships, your health, and your overall sense of fulfillment. What did you learn that can make your life better?

If you had a bad year, it’s possible you were a wholly innocent victim, or maybe your own actions or attitudes contributed to serious grief or unhappiness. Either way, please accept my best wishes and sincere condolences. Please be careful, however, not to wallow in sorrow, sympathy, shame, or self-doubt. Don’t allow yesterday’s pain to become tomorrow’s suffering.

Be accountable, but be fair to yourself.

Start the next stage of your life’s journey with optimism and confidence.

Remember, you’re the captain of your own ship. Take the wheel, choose your course, and get on your way.

There may be rough seas ahead, but there will also be enough achievement, growth, reconciliation, and true joy to make the journey worth it.

Abe Lincoln pointed out that one of the good things about the future is it always comes one day at a time.

May this new year be your best year – so far.

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Millennials: Why are they unhappy?

H = R – E
Happiness = Reality – Expectations
That really makes a lot of sense.
Millennials (and other generations) should expect great lives.  I don’t think there is anything wrong with high hopes and grand expectations.  I think the big challenging question is this:  In what time frames should I expect these great things?  Greatness will come over years of mastering your craft.  As long as we all understand the 10,000 Rule (it takes 10,000 hours of practice to be considered an expert), then I think we’ll all be in great shape.
Enjoy the read.
Jaime
millennialscollage

Rain Delay Speech

 

There is a serious leadership moment when Heyward called a Team Meeting (Players only) during the rain delay in Game 7.

Heyward’s message, via MLB.com:

“I told them I love them. I told them I’m proud of the way they overcame everything together. I told them everyone has to look in the mirror, and know everyone contributed to this season and to where we are at this point. I said, ‘I don’t know how it’s going to happen, how we’re going to do it, but let’s go out and try to get a W.'”

Great lessons for all of us.  We all have moments when we need to give the right speech at the right time.
When has been a time in your life when you heard the right thing at the right time?  Have you been the person that needed to give this speech?  Comment below!
Jaime

Watch the Speech here: Rain Delay Speech

Being Grateful

Thanksgiving is a great time to reflect on what we are most grateful for this year.  I am particularly grateful for family, good health, great business partners, In-n-out and the Lakers winning (lately!).

I received the following article from Michael Josephson.  I’ve been following him since I moved to LA in 1998.  He ran a radio program called “Character Counts”, and I have found his blogs and words of wisdom to be a great inspiration.

Enjoy these words on gratitude and it’s importance.  What are you grateful for this season?  I would love to hear about it in the comments section!

Jaime

 

Be Thankful for Your Parents

On this Thanksgiving Day, I’d like to remind children of all ages to think about your parents and all the things you could feel thankful for. Even if you didn’t have a perfect home life or ideal parents, it’s a good day to appreciate those who need affirmation, approval, and encouragement as much as you did when you were a child.

It’s natural to criticize your parents and be preoccupied with your own life, but this doesn’t free you from the basic responsibility to be courteous, kind, empathetic, respectful, and grateful.

Children, especially teens and young adults, often become so self-absorbed with their own lives that they really believe they’re too busy or too poor to be attentive to their parents’ emotional needs. They don’t make thoughtful phone calls or get even symbolic birthday, anniversary, or holiday gifts (with parents, it really is the thought that counts). Because their parents forgive them, they think what they did or didn’t do is okay. Well, it isn’t.

You have an enormous power to cause happiness or hurt. Sharing good news, even asking for advice, can give your mom or dad great pleasure and pride. If, however, you ignore, demean, or shut out your parents due to thoughtlessness or malice, you can cause enduring distress, even misery.

Good parents – the ones who are easiest to hurt – change their lives in thousands of ways for their children. They don’t do it for gratitude, but they deserve thankfulness. In a moment of despair, King Lear utters an age-old truth: “How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to have a thankless child.”

Make America Kind Again

With the results of the election settling in it really bothers me to see how much hate there is.  Trump fans are boastful and insulting (it seems).  Clinton fans (or Trump Haters) are very unhappy and vocal.
Check out how this one mom is trying to spread kindness amongst all the negativity out there
Somehow we all need to stop the hate.  
Jaime